Tuesday, 13 November 2012

Eco-dyeing

Many, many moons ago I used to spin and dye my own wool with natural dyes, my aim was always to find the brightest colours possible. I've been a fan of India Flint over the past few years and have both of her books which I constantly read. Up until now I've never actually given it a go until Sunday, whenI discovered Jude, through Jacky. Jude lives all of ten minutes away from me. I joined Jacky, Dot and Nat in this fabulous process. I'm hooked, I feel like Jekyll and Hyde, I love all of the bright colours of India and Mexico, but am also rather partial to the more subdued colours of Japan and eco dyeing. Having said that I will really be pushing the natural colour range to the limits.


This is the result of my days work on beautiful old silk fabric.


not hard to guess which was my favourite dye bath - this was the purple cabbage


I also loved this one - Nat very generously brought along some fresh tumeric to share


some of the bundles after they were removed from the dye pots - ideally you would wait a few days to open them put patience isn't one of my virtues.


Jude and Nat in discussion


this is the remains of the cabbage providing a beautiful blue, jewelled hue in Jude's garden


my first unravelling


this is one of my favourite pieces


as is this, I wonder why - the lovely purple rings are from purple carrots that Nat very kindly shared with us.


surprisingly this is my favourite piece, I love the design that developed from an old rusty coil of Judes - the yellow is Nat's tumeric she shared with us.


Jude had some fabric we could use, this was a white top that I dyed in the tumeric bath. It's not very big but I'm going to remove the capped sleeves, open it up down the back and add a panel of dyed fabric, I also plan to add lots of stitching - one day.


I came home so inspired that I had to keep going, I produced this piece at home. I have a few more bundles waiting to be opened, I'm trying to be good and not peak.


I'm on a mission now, I collected flower heads from the garden and have frozen them ready to have a go at the ice-flower dyeing in India's book. I can see nothing will be safe in my garden now.

Thanks for visiting and all of your lovely comments.
I've also been felt making so will have photos in my next post.


27 comments:

Nat Palaskas said...

Oh Ro, love love all your pieces. I'm glad you got into eco dyeing too. I love it so much I want to scream for the world to hear! I will be watching what bright colour you would come up with. It was lovely to catch up with you again - Hugs Nat

Blue Sky Dreaming said...

Your first photo...the stack of fabrics is exquisite! Oh, the yellows and soft lavenders! I am so excited by these fabrics...best of fun ahead! I'm working with cotton in a different way but so admire what you are approaching with this eco-dyeing!

Purly Wendy said...

Just beautiful Ro! I love the colours you have achieved.This is something I have always planned to do too!I often pour over India's book. A local workshop sounds great!

deb said...

Sounds like you are hooked Ro, and the weather was perfect.
Your fabrics are beautiful! Looking forward to seeing them.
I sense great excitement in what you have learnt, no going back now. xox

Jacky said...

You are hooked Ro .....looove all of your pieces and your sharing. Can't wait to see the results from ice dyeing...will be researching in my India flint books tonight.
Loved being in the workshop with you girls ...so inspiring. Jacky xox

meta said...

great results!

Dot said...

Just brilliant Ro. As with everything you do you have embraced Eco Dyeing with a passion! Gorgeous work and no doubt lots of purple fabric to come :).

ArtPropelled said...

I would also find it very difficult to wait a few days before unwrapping the bundles. Gorgeous colours and effects! It will be very interesting to see the iced flower dyed fabrics.

The Crafty Mugwump said...

I'm with you on the impatience bit Ro. I can't get enough of this process, especially as it means summer to me.The sight of all those fabrics drying on the line make me giddy with joy! I look forward to seeing how you use them.

Heather said...

Sounds like a wonderful day. I love the fabrics at all stages and the final results are almost too beautiful to use. I'd be afraid of mucking them up and wasting them!

Julie said...

Such wonderful fabrics and such vibrant colours too! I love that you have achieved all those beautiful marks and your favourite is my favourite too. I have tried a little natural dyeing but the results were much more muted. These are truly exciting results.

sue said...

oh I am dead envious - my India style dyeing has been far less successful I'm afraid! I have a freezer full of sour-sob petals waiting to try out that ice method too!

Barbara Lewis said...

I was shaking when I read your post. Not only because of the beauty of the things you made, but because of the fear that I'm going to jump on board with both feet to try this! OMG! I've always loved textiles (my first love was sewing) and enamel is all about color ... gorgeous work, Ro! Now, where to find the time ... which is the scary part. Maybe if I don't sleep? LOL!

rivergardenstudio said...

Ro, I love the way you pushed the natural color range to its limits! And your results are just beautiful!!!
What a spectacular day this looked like!!!
roxanne

Sophie Munns said...

Fascinating to see the results of your labours Ro... and as Roxanne commented ... pushing colours in the direction you have here.
Wonderful to play with the unknown in that sense. What next I wonder?
S

Denise Butterworth said...

You might want to try eucalyptus leaves - especially box - boiled gebtly with either silk or wool fabric. Gorgeous rich ochres! If you roll fresh leaves up in the fabric as well, you are left with the imprint of the leaves as well.

cathsheard said...

We have the most gorgeous India Flint book in the library - so understand your excitement. Have fun and I look forward to seeing you push the boundaries.

Karin Otto-Burfict said...

Your fabrics are gorgeous!
It motivated me enough to try to find the books. I love your blog!

suziqu's thread works said...

Oh Ro I can see all of these new eco-dyed fabrics coming to new life in your creative works. I love eco-dyeing and have had some fantastic results.
I too have India's latest book and just absolutely love it. If only there was more time to do more of this.
I did lots of this when I was spinning and weaving in the 70's over open fires out in the open - so much fun!
Great that you met up with Jude living so close - a great inspiration to you!
It would have been fun to present at your dyeing day together!
Hugs from the sunny South East Coast!
Suzy

Samantha Marshall said...

Looks amazing Ro!

Lis said...

Wow you had a fantastic time, such wonderful results, you are another addict - Nat might be in trouble for all the pushing she does if natural dyes were illegal substances!!

Judy said...

Ro, what fun you have been having, such beautiful subtle colours.

Emma said...

Your fabrics are beautiful, I need to be less frightened of the 'science' bits! Wish I lived 10 mins from these workshops!

Don Pezzano said...

Love those colours! The technique is so cool. Must, must must try this.

jackie said...

Exciting results. I love to look at the results from this type of dyeing but have tried hard to stop myself from being diverted yet again! I get a real buzz from colour,but have tried a more muted pallet this year. The pasta maker prints were much more interesting than I thought at the time. Thanks for your comment.

Judy Wise said...

Ro, the top you dyed is going to be fabulous. Gorgeous work as usual. xo

Sharon Eley said...

Did you premordant your fabric or use all silks? I froze my rose petals (without) separating them in a bag and they all turned brown in the freezer. Any suggestions? Thanks.